Y's View

Easy there, tiger!

Your bestie can ask you the most offensive question, and you’ll answer. But if a stranger asks you the same question, you’d ignore them, or worse, report them to the police. Unless they’re super cute; in which case you’re not appalled as much.

When your best friend asked, the question doesn’t seem offensive because you have a relationship, you know equally offensive stuff about them, and your reward is that rush of “happy hormones” and stronger bonding. You don’t have enough invested in the stranger to care.

Consent is directly proportionate to perceived value.

Keep this in mind when you’re asking strangers to signup for your newsletter. If their perceived value is less than the perceived value of their time, they’ll ignore you.

You can elevate the perceived value of your product or service gradually, over time, just like your best friend, who was once a stranger who turned into an acquaintance into a friend and ultimately, your ride or die,

Unless you’re offering something of higher perceived value than their personal information, don’t ask prospects for intimate details (EmiratesID/Mobile/IncomeBracket) right off the bat. A name and email are good enough to start with.

Then, pace yourself. Keep working on the relationship, give more than you get, and in time, you can ask them for anything, and they’ll happily oblige.

Discuss this on LinkedIn.

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